Center for Creative Retirement

We offer more educational and fun classes, trips and workshops to keep you actively engaged.

How to Register

  • Register online by selecting "Add to Cart" on the desired course(s) and select "Cart" at the bottom of the page when you are ready to process your registration.
    • The “Seats Left” information is updated every half hour and when you checkout.
  • Other registration options are available.

Courses

500 Years of Men's and Women's Fashion

The class will follow how fashion evolved for both men and women from the 1400s through the late 1800s and illustrate the styles of both the upper and working classes. What was considered a beautiful figure for a woman changed on a regular basis, and what women had to wear beneath their clothing formed the foundation of their appearance; the punishment women inflicted on their bodies to be in fashion will be difficult to comprehend. From the magnificent clothing of the wealthy, who were able to have custom garments made in silks, laces and silver metallic threads, to the clothing of the working class, who had to make do with homespun and trying to find secondhand clothing they could afford, both men and women tried to dress as well as possible to secure work and a suitable marriage. Garments for the rich and poor, both male and female, will be fully illustrated with detailed slides and descriptions.

Please review vaccination and mask protocols for on-campus classes.

Course will be held in Williams Hall, Room 113

Marilyn Sassi, Instructor

500 Years of Men's and Women's Fashion
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Friday, 4/29
10:00 am - 12:00 pm
ZCCR-654 500 17 seats left $19

A Visit to Mabee Farm Historic Site

The Mabee Farm Historic Site, part of the Schenectady County Historical Society, is the oldest farm in the Mohawk Valley, dating from 1705. Mabee Farm Historic Site offers visitors today vibrant educational and recreational opportunities. With its deep history and riverside beauty, it’s the perfect place to explore Mohawk Valley heritage. Walk across weathered pine floors in the home of settlers Jan and Annette. Say hello to our resident farm animals. Admire the hand-pegged Dutch Barn from the 1760s or just meander through our orchards, gardens, and forest trails. Our friendly staff and volunteers will take you on a journey from the distant agricultural past to the dawn of Schenectady’s industrial era. Course includes a $10 materials fee. Paula Johannesen, Coordinator

Directions: Take I-890 towards Scotia to Exit 1A (Route 5S). The Farm is 2.7 miles on your right. From Amsterdam and West: Take NYS Thruway (I-90 East) towards NYC to Exit 26 toward Rotterdam Junction. Take Exit 1A to Route 5S. The Farm is 2.7 miles on your right.

From Albany and East: Take NYS Thruway (I-90 West) towards Buffalo to Exit 25 (Schenectady). Take I-890 towards Scotia to Exit 1A (Route 5S). The Farm is 2.7 miles on your right.

A Visit to Mabee Farm Historic Site
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Thursday, 4/21
10:00 am - 12:00 pm
ZCCR-554 600 9 seats left $20

Characters and Criminals of the Capital District

Political correctness did not exist in the mid-1800s. The newspapers could be relentless in their ridicule or attacks on local criminals and minorities. On occasion, they were truly supportive of unfortunate individuals who were trying to better themselves. This presentation will cover several of the colorful characters and criminals that were once well known to readers of the local newspapers.

Please review vaccination and mask protocols for on-campus classes.

Course will be held in Williams Hall, Room 113

Jill Knapp, Instructor

Characters and Criminals of the Capital District
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Tuesday, 5/3
9:30 am - 11:30 am
ZCCR-664 600 7 seats left $15

For the Cause - Women of the Civil War

While Civil War generals, armies, and battles have been the subject of countless books,

magazine articles, movies and documentaries, the contributions of women in the conflict have been less noted. Women were no less involved than the men, sometimes in strikingly similar roles. The first woman ever to lead a military mission for the U.S. Army did so in 1863 – and she was a woman of color. The only female Medal of Honor recipient was a Civil War surgeon who struggled for recognition both during and after the war. Women on both sides of the conflict supported their respective causes in ways great and small, from serving as nurses, spies, writers, in battle, in industry, or by simply keeping the fires burning at home. For some, their war activities propelled them toward a new, independent mindset, and more active future roles in society.

Please review vaccination and mask protocols for on-campus classes.

Course will be held in Williams Hall, Room 113

Phyllis Chapman, Instructor

For the Cause - Women of the Civil War
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Wednesday, 3/30
9:30 am - 11:30 am
ZCCR-659 600 13 seats left $25

Getting Started With Your Family History

Genealogy, or the study of family history, has been described as the “fastest-growing hobby in America.” With the popularity of television shows like “Who Do You Think You Are,” the trend of giving DNA kits as gifts and the reconnecting of distant relatives using social media, it’s no wonder more Americans than ever before are interested in discovering their roots. Professional genealogist Lisa Dougherty will help you get started in the pursuit of your own family history by offering guidelines for gathering information, effectively using DNA testing and social media, and organizing your research. 

Please review vaccination and mask protocols for on-campus classes.

Course will be held in Williams Hall, Room 113

Lisa Dougherty, Instructor

Getting Started With Your Family History
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Tuesday, 4/26
9:30 am - 11:30 am
ZCCR-656 600 7 seats left $15

Great Ladies North Broadway Tour

See and hear the fascinating historical tales of the Victorian houses (originally named “Great Ladies”) on North Broadway in Saratoga. The tour includes stories about the man who was so angry at the city, he turned his back on it; the son who took his mother’s jewels from her safety deposit box and what he did with them; the man who won three Academy Awards; the competition between two shirt manufacturers; and “The Million Dollar House.” Wear comfortable shoes. Course fee includes a $15 materials fee. Hollis Palmer, Instructor Marie D’Entrone, Coordinator

Directions: From the Troy/Albany area take I-87 North to exit 13N and merge onto Route 9 North toward Saratoga Springs. This walking tour is meeting at 563 North Broadway, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866, on-street parking is available in Saratoga Springs.

Great Ladies North Broadway Tour
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Thursday, 5/19
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
ZCCR-231 600 0 seats left $25Section Full

Call to be added to wait list

Gunpowder Girls and Drummer Boys

This presentation will discuss two important roles played by many youths under the age of 18 during the Civil War. On the home front, some young girls were employed doing very dangerous jobs in arsenals. We’ll learn about that work and its associated perils. On the battlefront, in addition to their obvious duties, young lads were messengers, cooks’ assistants, and searched battlefields for wounded. Additionally, we’ll meet some who displayed conspicuous courage.

Please review vaccination and mask protocols for on-campus classes.

Course will be held in Day Care Center, Room B06

Jim Cochran, Instructor

Gunpowder Girls and Drummer Boys
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Tuesday, 3/29
9:30 am - 11:30 am
ZCCR-657 600 15 seats left $12

Head to Toe in the 19th Century

Mark Twain observed that “Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.” This lighthearted look at the wide variety of style, silhouettes and fads that kept the fashion-conscious on their toes for 100 years illustrates that we do define ourselves through dress – and always have. While the ladies indulged in a dazzling array of shape-shifting silhouettes during the period, the gentlemen embraced an increasingly somber and restrained style. That’s the surface tale, but the most fascinating fashion facts may lie beneath the surface. Men’s corsets? Bustles for shoplifters? Beetle jewelry? How did they keep it all clean? Prepare to be entertained!

Please review vaccination and mask protocols for on-campus classes.

Course will be held in Williams Hall, Room 113

Phyllis Chapman, Instructor

Head to Toe in the 19th Century
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Wednesday, 4/20
9:30 am - 11:30 am
ZCCR-660 600 18 seats left $25

History Isn't Old: It's New

Any idea why an old desk is important to our past? Do you know about the “French Connection” to the area? How about the torrid love affair between Kitty Heaton and George Hurlburt? Come hear all this and much more and see how the past truly connects to now - because “History Isn’t Old; It’s New.”

Please review vaccination and mask protocols for on-campus classes.

Course will be held in TEC-SMART Auditorium

Rick Reynolds, Instructor

History Isn't Old: It's New
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Tuesday, 4/26
12:30 pm - 2:30 pm
ZCCR-669 600 29 seats left $12

Irish Genealogy - A Fresh Approach

Have you been researching your Irish ancestry and run into brick walls? Tired of seeing all those records that just say “Ireland”? Fed up with ancestors with the same name? It’s time for a new approach! Join genealogist-in-residence for the Irish American Heritage Museum Lisa Dougherty for some new ideas to locate that elusive place of origin for your Irish family!

Please review vaccination and mask protocols for on-campus classes.

Course will be held in Williams Hall, Room 113

Lisa Dougherty, Instructor

Irish Genealogy - A Fresh Approach
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Tuesday, 3/22
9:30 am - 11:30 am
ZCCR-655 600 28 seats left $15

Irish Songs of Love, Humor, Happiness and Freedom

As we near the annual celebration of St. Patrick’s Day, many of us, Irish or not, have a desire to hear the Irish songs of the season. Many of us don’t know the origin or the songs or their meaning. Join Capital Region Irish ballad, rebel and pub singer Irish Don Kelly as he provides the back story and the meaning of many of those Irish songs that we have grown to love over the years. This class is very popular, so sign up early for your seat. Song lyrics will be provided for those who wish to sing along. Sl`ainte (Cheers)! 

Please review vaccination and mask protocols for on-campus classes.

Course will be held in Williams Hall, Room 113

Don Kelly, Instructor

Irish Songs of Love, Humor, Happiness and Freedom
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Thursday, 3/10
9:30 am - 11:30 am
ZCCR-665 600 24 seats left $15

Knickerbocker Family Mansion: Ghosts, Tour and Lunch

The Knickerbocker Historical Society will be our hosts as they tell us about the history and ghosts of the Knickerbocker Mansion, which dates from about 1770. They will arrange for historical ‘ghosts’ to give moving firsthand accounts of their lives and experiences, and they will explain the renovations – the not-for-profit Society rescued the mansion from certain demolition and has continued to restore it. Our visit concludes with a chance to tour the mansion and to a colonial lunch cooked with authentic recipes, a delicious side to the history of the mansion. Course fee includes $25 materials fee. Lea Darling, Coordinator

Directions: Take Route 40 north to Schaghticoke. At the red light as you approach the village, turn left on Route 67, travel west toward Mechanicville. Drive 3 miles west, turn right onto Knickerbocker Road. The Mansion is the first building on the right.

Knickerbocker Family Mansion: Ghosts, Tour and Lunch
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Wednesday, 5/11
10:30 am - 1:30 pm
ZCCR-137 600 0 seats left $35Section Full

Call to be added to wait list

Learn to Play Mah Jongg

Whether you are a complete beginner or just need a refresher, join us in learning to play Mah Jongg. This class includes basic instruction and the opportunity to play with people of varying skill levels. If you have a Mah Jongg set, please bring it with you.This will include a $10 materials fee for Mah Jongg card.

Please review vaccination and mask protocols for on-campus classes.

Course will be held in Day Care Center, Room B05

Criss Macaione, Instructor

Learn to Play Mah Jongg
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Wednesdays, 3/23 - 4/27
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
ZSPI-119 600 0 seats left $69Section Full

Call to be added to wait list

Let Those Meneely Bells Ring

We all have heard about them, some may have even seen a few, but the background of the Meneely bells is absolutely fascinating in the Troy area. Come get the scoop and hear all about them. What they were made of? How they were tuned? Where are they now? Find out the difference between a chime, a carillon and a peel. Gene Burns will share his experiences and fascinating knowledge. 

Please review vaccination and mask protocols for on-campus classes.

Course will be held in Williams Hall, Room 113

Gene Burns, Instructor

Let Those Meneely Bells Ring
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Monday, 4/25
9:30 am - 11:30 am
ZCCR-626 600 12 seats left $22

Lights, Camera, Action! 200 Years of Entertainment

Join Kathryn Sheehan, Rensselaer County and Troy City Historian as we explore the history of entertainment, from the first national performance of “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” held at the Troy Museum in 1852, to the temperance troupes that played in the towns along the Route 22 corridor, to the most recent filming of the HBO series “The Gilded Age” in downtown Troy. From Hoosick Falls, where the Eberle Brothers made their mark in the Big Band era, to Troy’s Oscar-, Emmy- and Tony-award-winning Maureen Stapleton, this illustrated lecture will highlight these and other performers in Rensselaer County from the 19th through the 21st century.  We will also explore the built environment of halls, movie houses and drive in theaters throughout the county, some of which are still going strong today.

Please review vaccination and mask protocols for on-campus classes.

Course will be held in Williams Hall, Room 113

Kathryn Sheehan, Instructor

Lights, Camera, Action! 200 Years of Entertainment
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Wednesday, 4/13
9:30 am - 11:30 am
ZCCR-661 600 13 seats left $19

Luther Forest in Malta

The Luther Forest in Malta is one of the best known locations in the Capital District. But what were its origins? It was once the largest private experimental forest in New York State, but it grew from a resort hotel operation and sawmill business, and addressed the impoverishment of Malta’s poor soil by careless farmers. We will explore its 140-year history as forest, housing tract, industrial park and successful water system. This course will be presented by Field Horne, president of the Saratoga County Historical Center, who will also share an introduction to the work of the Center’s 50 years at Brookside in Ballston Spa.

Please review vaccination and mask protocols for on-campus classes.

Course will be held in TEC-SMART Auditorium

Field Horne, Instructor

Luther Forest in Malta
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Wednesday, 4/13
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
ZCCR-670 600 32 seats left $12

Morning with Louisa May Alcott

Come and spend a morning with Louisa May Alcott. Louisa was an American novelist, short story writer, and poet, but she was best known as the author of the novel “Little Women.“ She will tell you stories of her family, life, writing career, and share some of her literary works. Step back in time with historical reenactor Denise Wright while she brings the author to life through pictures, words, and stories.

Please review vaccination and mask protocols for on-campus classes.

Course will be held in Williams Hall, Room 113

Denise Wright, Instructor

Morning with Louisa May Alcott
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Tuesday, 4/5
9:30 am - 11:30 am
ZCCR-531 600 7 seats left $12

New Skete Monasteries

Experience the breathtaking churches, extensive gardens, waterfall features and the peace and solitude of New Skete! Learn about its history, art and culture. Your guided tour includes a tour of the churches, with one of the brothers giving a lecture on their history and the icons depicted on the walls, a question-and-answer session, a visit to the Meditation Garden and a slice of cheesecake. You may even catch a glimpse of the famed New Skete German Shepherd dog. Your tour will end with a visit to the monks’ gift shop and a stop at the nuns’ monastery for an opportunity to purchase cheesecake for home. Course includes a $10 materials fee. Brother Gregory, Instructor Lea Darling, Coordinator

Please use GPS for directions. The Address is: 273 New Skete Lane, Cambridge, NY

New Skete Monasteries
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Wednesday, 5/4
10:30 am - 12:00 pm
ZCCR-585 600 0 seats left $20Section Full

Call to be added to wait list

New York's American Anthems

Learn the little-known New York stories behind some of America’s best-known songs. To make fun of the ragtag American soldiers arriving at Fort Crailo in Rensselaer, a British military officer wrote a humorous song, “Yankee Doodle.” How was it transformed into America’s first patriotic song? Even though she couldn’t vote, the “New Woman” was taking her place in society, bolstered by this popular 1908 song. Everyone knows the chorus from “Take Me Out to the Ball Game,” but few understand it was suffrage’s secret song! Irving Berlin’s finale for his 1918 show, “Yip Yip Yaphank,” was not a good fit, so he took it out. Twenty years later, “God Bless America” was a number one hit. But could the parody be even more be more popular than the original? Instructor Sandy Schuman will amaze you with the incredible stories behind these songs and more!

Please review vaccination and mask protocols for on-campus classes.

Course will be held in Williams Hall, Room 113

Sandy Schuman, Instructor

New York's American Anthems
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Thursday, 3/31
9:30 am - 11:30 am
ZCCR-658 600 16 seats left $22

Oakwood Cemetery Walking Tour

Founded in 1848, Oakwood Cemetery in Troy was one of the first “rural cemeteries” in the country, with serpentine roads, lovely landscaping and beautiful monuments. We’ll stroll along Millionaire’s Row and hear fascinating stories about some of the influential citizens of 19th century Troy as well as interesting tales of some not-so-famous ‘residents.’ We’re always adding new stories when we discover them! Our walk will be highlighted by stops at the site where HBO filming was done for “The Golden Age” and at the panoramic overlook where you can see the Cohoes Falls, the Hudson and Mohawk Rivers and sometimes even a soaring hawk or bald eagle. Dress appropriately for the weather and wear good walking shoes. You might want to bring bottled water as well. This slow-paced walk is approximately 1.5 miles round trip and is on mainly level paved roads with one or two dirt paths. Course fee includes $15 materials fee. Heidi Norton Klinowski, Instructor Paula Johannesen, Coordinator

Directions: Oakwood Cemetery is located off Route 7 East (Hoosick Street) in Troy. Take Oakwood Avenue (aka Route 40) north from Hoosick Street for about 1/2 mile. You will see the entrance gates on your left. Park near the flagpole. NOTE: If you are using a GPS or Google Maps, use 186 Oakwood Avenue Troy. Do not use 50 - 101st Street.

Oakwood Cemetery Walking Tour
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Wednesday, 4/27
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
ZCCR-600 600 0 seats left $25Section Full

Call to be added to wait list

Ronald Reagan: 40th President of the United States and So Much More

When you ask the question, “Who was Ronald Reagan?” the most frequently given reply is, “He was president of the United States in the 1980s.” While that is true, this lecture will delve into not just his presidency, but his earlier life, all the way back to growing up in small-town rural Illinois. We’ll explore his early careers as a broadcaster, actor, union president, and corporate pitch man before his entry onto the political scene, which was brought about by a famous speech he gave in support of another man running for president – and how that one speech would catapult him into electoral politics. You’ll learn how he upset a sitting governor of the largest state in the union, then won re-election four years later; and how although he won the presidency in 1980, that was not his first time seeking the office. Most importantly, we’ll explore his presidency in depth: the highs and lows, and the man behind the policies. Ronald Reagan in the 1980s evoked great sentiment. Many loved him, many hated him. You’ll learn about his legendary gift for public speaking using humor, nostalgia, and patriotism to convey a message, with terms and phrases like “Evil Empire,” “Go ahead make my day,” and “Mister Gorbachev, tear down this wall.”

Ronald Reagan was no shrinking violet and when he was president he was a lightning rod for both the left and the right. After leaving office, he would pen a touching and poignant letter to the country announcing that he had a debilitating disease which would ultimately take his life. You’ll learn about the heartfelt emotion so many Americans displayed upon his passing. Love him or hate him, he became a larger-than-life presence and elicited a strong emotional response from many on all sides of the political spectrum, in the US and around the world. The goal is to have you come away with a newfound appreciation for our 40th president, as a president, statesman, and patriot. 

Please review vaccination and mask protocols for on-campus classes.

Course will be held in Williams Hall, Room 113

Pat Hogan, Instructor

Ronald Reagan: 40th President of the United States and So Much More
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Monday, 4/4
9:30 am - 11:30 am
ZCCR-642 600 16 seats left $12

Setting America's Table

Ceramics are one of the archaeologist’s finest tools in determining the dates and lifestyles of the occupants who once lived on the historic sites under excavation. In the winter of 1970-71, construction began on the ramp leading to 890 and when pilings were put in, construction workers dug into a number of the original cellars of Albany’s first occupants at Fort Orange. Built in 1624, Fort Orange contained the earliest ceramics used by the Dutch in New York. The extensive research that went into their identification will begin this class. Utilitarian redware, salt-glazed stoneware made in Germany, and the forerunner of Delft, majolica, as well as fine porcelain made only in China, will be included. Many examples will be illustrated from the earliest period and continue into the late 19th century, including their origins and makers. Emphasis will be on the types of pottery found in the Mohawk and Hudson Valley areas.

Please review vaccination and mask protocols for on-campus classes.

Course will be held in Williams Hall, Room 113

Marilyn Sassi, Instructor

Setting America's Table
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Friday, 5/6
10:00 am - 12:00 pm
ZCCR-652 600 17 seats left $19

Spring Sensations - Exploring Nearby Nature Preserves

As the snow melts and the ground thaws, nature springs to life and puts on a glorious display. The spring palette includes a bounty of wildflowers like trillium, dog toothed violets, and lady slippers. An upward glance reveals the flowering shadblow and cherry. The first class at the college is really important and will include preparation, along with a presentation illustrating what we might see. In the following weeks, we will explore four of our favorite local preserves, taking time to observe, learn about and enjoy the plants, wildlife and natural beauty around us. Betty & John Nickles, Instructors

Spring Sensations - Exploring Nearby Nature Preserves
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Fridays, 4/8 - 4/8
10:00 am - 12:00 pm

Fridays, 4/22 - 5/13
10:00 am - 12:00 pm
ZCCR-062 600 0 seats left $12Section Full

Call to be added to wait list

Staying Young with Science Fun

Learning something new every day benefits your mind and your “socially distanced” life. Come and have some fun while you participate in a variety of science activities. In this class we will be making glowing volcanoes, elephant toothpaste, fireworks in a jar, exploding lunch bags, and more. All materials will be provided. Fran Pilato is a retired science teacher who has worked with students of all ages and abilities.

Please review vaccination and mask protocols for on-campus classes.

Course will be held in Day Care Center, Room B05

Fran Pilato, Instructor 

Staying Young with Science Fun
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Tuesday, 5/3
9:30 am - 11:30 am
ZCCR-524 600 11 seats left $12

Staying on Track: Navigation Skills Class

Join Josh Pulito at the Dyken Pond Environmental Education Center for this beginner navigation class. This class will help participants build the skills to explore new areas with confidence. Develop your skills reading a trail map and using a compass in a forested setting. Cover methods of finding your way when you are without traditional tools. Learn how to safely go off trail and find your way back. Leave with the knowledge and confidence to explore the forest with ease. Course fee includes a $10 materials fee. Josh Pulito, Instructor Marie D’Entrone, Coordinator

Directions: Do Not Follow Your Car GPS- Some GPS units are directing people to the east side of the lake, which is 25 minutes from the Center. Please follow the directions below.

Directions: From Route 2 East on Route 2. Watch for Tamarac School on the left and Tamarac Plaza on the right. Go 1.5 miles. Watch for Dyken Pond sign on the right. Turn right onto Route 79 (Blue Factory Rd). Go two miles. Turn left at Dyken Pond sign onto Route 80 (Madonna Lake Rd). Bear right at fork (Jay Hakes Rd is to the left). Bear right at Dyken Pond sign onto Dyken Pond Rd (go straight instead of following the turn). Continue 2 ½ miles. Dyken Pond Road is a dirt road. Don’t get discouraged. We’re at the end of the road!

From Points West Follow Route 7 east from Troy. Continue approximately 4 miles. Turn right at traffic light onto Route 278. Continue until the end. At traffic light, turn left onto Route 2. You will see Tamarac School and Plaza. Follow directions above.

From Points East: From Route 22, follow Route 2 west. You will pass the blinking light in the town of Grafton. Approximately ½ mile from there, look for the white Methodist Church on the left. Turn left at the church onto County Route 85 and continue for 3.1 miles. Turn left onto Route 80 (Madonna Lake Rd). After .8 miles, turn left at the sign.

Staying on Track: Navigation Skills Class
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Friday, 4/8
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
ZCCR-667 600 0 seats left $20Section Full

Call to be added to wait list

The Beauty, Design and Fragrance of Spring Flowers

Come feast your eyes on beautiful blooms with instructor Michele Peters, and watch her create layer upon layer of gorgeous spring arrangements. With more than 30 years of design experience, Michele‘s goal is to create a masterpiece with color, texture, shape and style and teach you how to bring your own ambience to every occasion. We never know what magic will unfold, but Michele always brings her energy, passion, and creativity. Come join us as we ooh and aah, and you may be one of the lucky students who carries one of her creations home! Course fee includes a $18 materials fee.

Please review vaccination and mask protocols for on-campus classes.

Course will be held in Williams Hall, Room 113

Michele Peters, Instructor

The Beauty, Design and Fragrance of Spring Flowers
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Thursday, 4/28
9:30 am - 12:00 pm
ZCCR-374 600 18 seats left $28

The Capital Police District

An early attempt at inter-municipal policing was mandated by the New York State Legislature in 1865. The Capital Police District, which included the cities of Albany and Troy and contiguous portions of several adjacent communities, went into effect on July 1, 1865. In 1866 the law was amended to include Schenectady, by including the territory within the lines of the New York Central Railroad (a strip about 100 feet wide) between the cities of Albany and Schenectady. The perceived needs for the district, its rules and governance, impact on crime, and funding will be covered. The issues leading to its demise in 1870 will also be discussed. 

Please review vaccination and mask protocols for on-campus classes.

Course will be held in Williams Hall, Room 113

Jill Knapp, Instructor

The Capital Police District
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Tuesday, 4/12
9:30 am - 11:30 am
ZCCR-663 600 32 seats left $15

The Mansion to Mansion Tour

Step back in time with local author and Victorian historian Dr. Hollis Palmer as he tells the story of the families who built the majestic houses on Saratoga’s Union Avenue. We will even have the opportunity to go inside two of the grand mansions. The tour begins at 55 Union Avenue. Once underway, we visit Union Gables, built in 1901 by an orphan who, through his personal drive, became one of the largest merchants in the village. We’ll then stroll down Union Avenue toward the Saratoga Race Track, learning the history of the families who built the houses and would call them home. Our next look inside a mansion is at Saratoga Dreams, built in the 1880’s. Hear how the house was originally designed and why the floor plans were changed before it was completed. The walking tour is 90 minutes and students will receive a copy of one of Dr. Palmer’s books. Course fee includes $25 materials fee.

Dr. Hollis Palmer, Instructor

Paula Johannesen, Coordinator

Directions: Take I‐87 North to exit 13N and merge onto Route 9 North toward Saratoga Springs. Meet at 31 Union Ave.

The Mansion to Mansion Tour
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Thursday, 5/5
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
ZCCR-641 600 0 seats left $35Section Full

Call to be added to wait list

The Many Dimensions of Folk Art

Nineteenth century America was comprised mostly of farmers and the small farm towns that were built in between sprawling acreage. The other half of America’s occupants were merchants or involved in a specialized trade. American folk art grew out of a craft tradition and, with America’s ingenuity, turned simple, mundane objects into true expressions of beauty. The most common workaday objects were decorated at this time, turning them into true artistic expressions created by individuals born with an innate talent for color and design. It is this talent that separates folk art from the academic and creates America’s unique folk art from the melting pot of cultures that made their home here. In this class we will explore examples of tavern signs, fire boards to be used when a fire wasn’t needed in fireplaces, carousel horses, the detailed carvings on powder horns and whale teeth, and more examples of American folk art.

Please review vaccination and mask protocols for on-campus classes.

Course will be held in Williams Hall, Room 113

Marilyn Sassi, Instructor

The Many Dimensions of Folk Art
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Friday, 4/22
10:00 am - 12:00 pm
ZCCR-653 600 21 seats left $19

The Saugerties Lighthouse

Join us at the Saugerties Lighthouse, an 1869 landmark on the Hudson River that now stands proudly as a living museum and a renowned bed and breakfast. The Saugerties Lighthouse Conservancy maintains the lighthouse and adjacent lands for the enjoyment of the public. The restored red-brick lighthouse offers overnight bed and breakfast accommodations, public tours and special events. Furnished as it may have looked in the early 20th century, the lighthouse contains a small museum, gift shop, parlor, kitchen, keepers’ quarters, and two guest bedrooms. The operational light tower offers a panoramic view of the Hudson River Valley and Catskill Mountains. Because of its location on the river, tours must be scheduled with tide schedules in mind. The lighthouse can be reached via a half-mile nature trail of dirt and rock paths with wooden bridges and boardwalks and sandy trails. It is at the end of Lighthouse Drive in the village of Saugerties, New York. Suitable, comfortable shoes are recommended. Course fee includes a $8 materials fee. Paula Johannesen, Coordinator

Directions: Southbound on NYS Thruway/I-87 to the RT-32 exit-(Exit 20) - toward Saugerties/Woodstock. Turn left onto NY-32, turn left onto NY-212/NY-32, which becomes Ulster Ave. Continue on Ulster Ave. for 1.0 mile, bear right at Market St., go 1 block turn left at Main St., go 1 block stay straight to US-9W/Main St. Go 0.4 miles where 9W curves to the left, turn right onto Mynderse St., go 0.3 miles turn slight left onto Lighthouse Dr. Go 0.4 miles turn right into the lighthouse parking lot after the US Coast Guard station. Follow the lighthouse trail. Go 0.5 miles.  Please wear comfortable shoes.

The Saugerties Lighthouse
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Thursday, 5/19
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm
ZCCR-337 600 0 seats left $20Section Full

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To Life...Parts I and II

“To Life” is a 10-part DVD series featuring songs from Broadway musicals that illustrate the importance of making every day the best day of your life! American musicals have always featured songs of optimism, hope, celebration, following your dreams and making every day the best. Parts I and II feature songs from Broadway musicals by Rodgers and Hammerstein, Jerry Herman, Stephen Sondheim, Lerner and Loewe, Charles Strouse and Jule Styne, with Liza Minnelli, Barbra Streisand, Judy Garland, Elaine Stritch, Julie Andrews, Patti Lupone, Angela Lansbury and Carol Channing.

Please review vaccination and mask protocols for on-campus classes.

Course will be held in Williams Hall, Room 113

Richard Feldman, Instructor

To Life...Parts I and II
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Wednesday, 4/6
9:30 am - 11:30 am
ZCCR-503 600 20 seats left $15

Town of Watervliet into the City of Watervliet

This fascinating program discusses the Town of Watervliet’s colonial origin from the manor of Rensselaerwyck to the fragmentation of the town from its founding in 1788 into smaller towns and villages. It also documents the changes that resulted in the transformation of the Town of Watervliet into the City of Watervliet. We’ll discuss the significance of three of these villages – Port Schuyler (formerly Washington) Gibbonsville and West Troy – and their merger into the incorporated Village of West Troy and then the City of Watervliet in 1896. 

Please review vaccination and mask protocols for on-campus classes.

Course will be held in Williams Hall, Room 113

Tom Ragosta, Instructor

Town of Watervliet into the City of Watervliet
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Monday, 4/11
9:30 am - 11:30 am
ZCCR-666 600 30 seats left $22

Wetland Walk

Join Josh Pulito at the Dyken Pond Environmental Education Center to visit and explore several of the wetlands at Dyken Pond Center. Learn about different types of wetlands, their overall importance, how they were formed and the plants and animals that call them their homes. See insectivorous and carnivorous plants firsthand and learn about their adaptations. Must be able to hike 1.5 miles of trail. Course fee includes a $10 materials fee. Josh Pulito, Instructor Marie D’Entrone, Coordinator

Directions: Do Not Follow Your Car GPS- Some GPS units are directing people to the east side of the lake, which is 25 minutes from the Center. Please follow the directions below.

Directions: From Route 2 East on Route 2. Watch for Tamarac School on the left and Tamarac Plaza on the right. Go 1.5 miles. Watch for Dyken Pond sign on the right. Turn right onto Route 79 (Blue Factory Rd). Go two miles. Turn left at Dyken Pond sign onto Route 80 (Madonna Lake Rd). Bear right at fork (Jay Hakes Rd is to the left). Bear right at Dyken Pond sign onto Dyken Pond Rd (go straight instead of following the turn). Continue 2 ½ miles. Dyken Pond Road is a dirt road. Don’t get discouraged. We’re at the end of the road!

From Points West Follow Route 7 east from Troy. Continue approximately 4 miles. Turn right at traffic light onto Route 278. Continue until the end. At traffic light, turn left onto Route 2. You will see Tamarac School and Plaza. Follow directions above.

From Points East: From Route 22, follow Route 2 west. You will pass the blinking light in the town of Grafton. Approximately ½ mile from there, look for the white Methodist Church on the left. Turn left at the church onto County Route 85 and continue for 3.1 miles. Turn left onto Route 80 (Madonna Lake Rd). After .8 miles, turn left at the sign.

Wetland Walk
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Thursday, 5/12
10:00 am - 12:00 pm
ZCCR-668 600 0 seats left $20Section Full

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Women of New Netherland and Culture, Trade and Economy

2 PRESENTATIONS IN 1!

Women of New Netherland

This presentation focuses on women living in 17th century New Netherland, the Dutch colony that existed in what is now New York, Connecticut, and New Jersey.  Women of different Native American nations, enslaved and free women of African descent, and female Dutch settlers were deeply involved in the development of the colony of New Netherland. This presentation examines women’s everyday lives and highlights specific women and the roles they played in 17th century Dutch colonial life.

Culture, Trade and Economy in New Netherland’s Hudson Valley

This presentation examines the culture and economy of New Netherland in the broader context of the Dutch trade networks on the Atlantic Ocean. The earliest Dutch settlements in the upper Hudson Valley focused on trading furs with Native Americans. Over time, the range of agricultural and commercial enterprises took root in the Dutch colony of New Netherland. As the colony grew and settlements became more established, Dutch ships crisscrossed the Atlantic transporting everything from furs to building supplies to luxury goods for New Netherland households. Slave trading vessels trafficked enslaved Africans to New Netherland, and ships loaded with food from New Netherland fed enslaved people on sugar plantations in the Caribbean. By the time the English took New Netherland and renamed it New York, life in the Hudson Valley greatly resembled life in Holland during the 17th century, resulting in what one historian has called a “Holland on the Hudson.” But the colony and those living in it also retained aspects of Native American and African cultural traditions as well. Using archaeological evidence and archival sources, this presentation examines the culture and cultures of New Netherland as it relates to the trading colony’s place within the Dutch Atlantic.    

Please review vaccination and mask protocols for on-campus classes.

Course will be held in Williams Hall, Room 113

Sam Huntington, Instructor

Women of New Netherland and Culture, Trade and Economy
Schedule Section Seats Left Cost Register
Thursday, 4/7
9:30 am - 11:30 am
ZCCR-662 600 13 seats left $15

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Get in Touch

Community and Professional Education

Brahan Hall, Room 033

Fax: (518) 629-8103

Regular Hours: Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Summer Hours: Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.
(excluding college holidays and vacations)